This blog is an eclectic collection of interesting things I've found on Tumblr, the rest of the web, and beyond. Its name is taken from this quote by Dinah Craik:"Oh, the comfort — the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person — having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away."

Posts tagged with ‘Black and White’

mashable:

The Forgotten Photos of Mothers

A few weeks ago, 83-year-old photographer Ken Heyman rediscovered photographs that he took for a book called Family which he created with anthropologist Margaret Mead in 1965.

Mother’s Day Turns 100: Its Surprisingly Dark History

As Mother’s Day turns 100 this year, it’s known mostly as a time for brunches, gifts, cards, and general outpourings of love and appreciation.
But the holiday has more somber roots: It was founded for mourning women to remember fallen soldiers and work for peace. And when the holiday went commercial, its greatest champion, Anna Jarvis, gave everything to fight it, dying penniless and broken in a sanitarium.

Mother’s Day Turns 100: Its Surprisingly Dark History

As Mother’s Day turns 100 this year, it’s known mostly as a time for brunches, gifts, cards, and general outpourings of love and appreciation.

But the holiday has more somber roots: It was founded for mourning women to remember fallen soldiers and work for peace. And when the holiday went commercial, its greatest champion, Anna Jarvis, gave everything to fight it, dying penniless and broken in a sanitarium.

eyeheartnewyork:


Manhattan’s skyline, 1880 to 1932
This amazing series of photos was featured in TIME Magazine’s LIFE Aug 31, 1942 issue, “New York’s Skyline Sits for a Long Portrait.” The photos come from two amateurs of the Pierrepont family: John Jay Pierrepont, “a wealthy New Yorker”, was inspired from his Brooklyn rooftop view and took hundreds of photos from the vantage point until his death in 1923. His great-nephew, Abbot Low Moffat, continued the tradition until the Pierrepont home was bought by the city of New York to turn into a public park.
When Pierrepont took the first photos in 1880, church steeples and ship masts are the tallest structures, with the most recognizable landmark being Trinity Church on lower Broadway. By 1930, the lower Manhattan skyline was dominated by towers after the building boom.
Read the original article at Google Archives.

eyeheartnewyork:

Manhattan’s skyline, 1880 to 1932

This amazing series of photos was featured in TIME Magazine’s LIFE Aug 31, 1942 issue, “New York’s Skyline Sits for a Long Portrait.” The photos come from two amateurs of the Pierrepont family: John Jay Pierrepont, “a wealthy New Yorker”, was inspired from his Brooklyn rooftop view and took hundreds of photos from the vantage point until his death in 1923. His great-nephew, Abbot Low Moffat, continued the tradition until the Pierrepont home was bought by the city of New York to turn into a public park.

When Pierrepont took the first photos in 1880, church steeples and ship masts are the tallest structures, with the most recognizable landmark being Trinity Church on lower Broadway. By 1930, the lower Manhattan skyline was dominated by towers after the building boom.

Read the original article at Google Archives.

(via pegobry)

rcruzniemiec:

Through the Misty Air Adam Dobrovits

(via rcruzniemiec-deactivated2013020)

photojojo:

Jo Teeuwisse stumbled upon a treasure of 300 WWII photographs at a local flea market in France. After scanning the negatives, she decided to visit the places from various photos and attempt to photograph them from the same angle.

With the help of Photoshop, she was able to digitally blend her the photos together! 

Unseen WWII Photographs Blended With Modern Versions

via Zeutch

A Visual History of the Soviet Union
ONE TRIPPY PROFILE PIC
explore-blog:

Errol Morris identifies the first fake photograph, titled “The Valley of the Shadow of Death” and taken by photographer Roger Fenton in 1855. For more on the history of photographic tampering, see Morris’s excellent Believing Is Seeing (Observations on the Mysteries of Photography).
Hear the story on Radiolab: 

explore-blog:

Errol Morris identifies the first fake photograph, titled “The Valley of the Shadow of Death” and taken by photographer Roger Fenton in 1855. For more on the history of photographic tampering, see Morris’s excellent Believing Is Seeing (Observations on the Mysteries of Photography).

Hear the story on Radiolab: 

(Source: explore-blog)

photojojo:

Long exposure photographs of waterfalls never fail to impress us. Hengki Koentjoro shot this masterpiece while traveling in Indonesia! 
Jaw Dropping Black and White Photos of Indonesia
via Colossal

photojojo:

Long exposure photographs of waterfalls never fail to impress us. Hengki Koentjoro shot this masterpiece while traveling in Indonesia! 

Jaw Dropping Black and White Photos of Indonesia

via Colossal

creepylittleworld:

The man in this photograph is dead.
“In England, the deceased were usually photographed in their caskets. In the United States, however, it was traditional to pose the deceased person as if he or she were still living. Photographers had tricks of the trade such as stands and supports, makeup to hide pale skin, and even methods for opening the eyes and retouching photographs to subtly alter the blank expression of death.Children were usually posed in bed or in the arms of their parents. Adults were more often posed sitting in chairs or even standing with their bodies supported by special frames. Even beloved pets were sometimes photographed on their owner’s laps after death.”
You can see part of the stand that is holding him up behind his feet. 

creepylittleworld:

The man in this photograph is dead.

“In England, the deceased were usually photographed in their caskets. In the United States, however, it was traditional to pose the deceased person as if he or she were still living. Photographers had tricks of the trade such as stands and supports, makeup to hide pale skin, and even methods for opening the eyes and retouching photographs to subtly alter the blank expression of death.

Children were usually posed in bed or in the arms of their parents. Adults were more often posed sitting in chairs or even standing with their bodies supported by special frames. Even beloved pets were sometimes photographed on their owner’s laps after death.”

You can see part of the stand that is holding him up behind his feet. 

firsttimeuser:

The Lone Man by Cole Thompson

buzzfeed:

It’s pretty amazing what adding color to a black and white photograph can do.

life:

An Allied artillery barrage at night, the Italian front, 1944. 
Taken by Margaret Bourke-White — see more of her work here.

life:

An Allied artillery barrage at night, the Italian front, 1944. 

Taken by Margaret Bourke-White — see more of her work here.

vvolare:

Mount St. Helens erupting on May 18, 1980 by Robert Krimmel

(via nprfreshair)

theimpossiblecool:

Baker.