This blog is an eclectic collection of interesting things I've found on Tumblr, the rest of the web, and beyond. Its name is taken from this quote by Dinah Craik:"Oh, the comfort — the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person — having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away."

Posts tagged with ‘history’

15 Charts That Prove We’re Far From Post-Racial

On July 2, 1964, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law, officially banning discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It also ended racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and in general public facilities.
Fifty years removed from that milestone, it’s apparently easy to think that we’re over racism.
Here are 15 facts that prove that’s not the case.

15 Charts That Prove We’re Far From Post-Racial

On July 2, 1964, the Civil Rights Act was signed into law, officially banning discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin. It also ended racial segregation in schools, at the workplace and in general public facilities.

Fifty years removed from that milestone, it’s apparently easy to think that we’re over racism.

Here are 15 facts that prove that’s not the case.

So, let’s pretend that this current VA crises is an anomaly created by one unusually callous and ineffective president, but that would be just pretend. Or, on this Memorial Day weekend eve we can finally admit that America has had, for over 200 years, a great bipartisan tradition of honoring those who have fought for our freedom by fucking them over once they give their guns back.

vimeo:

1924 London meets modernity in Simon Smith’s video footage mashup.

Mother’s Day Turns 100: Its Surprisingly Dark History

As Mother’s Day turns 100 this year, it’s known mostly as a time for brunches, gifts, cards, and general outpourings of love and appreciation.
But the holiday has more somber roots: It was founded for mourning women to remember fallen soldiers and work for peace. And when the holiday went commercial, its greatest champion, Anna Jarvis, gave everything to fight it, dying penniless and broken in a sanitarium.

Mother’s Day Turns 100: Its Surprisingly Dark History

As Mother’s Day turns 100 this year, it’s known mostly as a time for brunches, gifts, cards, and general outpourings of love and appreciation.

But the holiday has more somber roots: It was founded for mourning women to remember fallen soldiers and work for peace. And when the holiday went commercial, its greatest champion, Anna Jarvis, gave everything to fight it, dying penniless and broken in a sanitarium.

kateoplis:

NY Train Project

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East
(Above: When Mohammed’s Caliphate conquered the Middle East)

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

(Above: When Mohammed’s Caliphate conquered the Middle East)

theweekmagazine:

11 beautiful alphabets from ancient and medieval times

Go way beyond Helvetica

mapsontheweb:

U.S. states by date of statehood

mapsontheweb:

U.S. states by date of statehood

nevver:

World’s first emoticon, 1648

nevver:

World’s first emoticon, 1648

Ronald Reagan’s Benghazi

In March of 1984, three months after Congress issued its report, militants struck American officials in Beirut again, this time kidnapping the C.I.A.’s station chief, Bill Buckley. Buckley was tortured and, eventually, murdered. Reagan, who was tormented by a tape of Buckley being tortured, blamed himself. Congress held no public hearings, and pointed fingers at the perpetrators, not at political rivals.
If you compare the costs of the Reagan Administration’s serial security lapses in Beirut to the costs of Benghazi, it’s clear what has really deteriorated in the intervening three decades. It’s not the security of American government personnel working abroad. It’s the behavior of American congressmen at home.

Ronald Reagan’s Benghazi

In March of 1984, three months after Congress issued its report, militants struck American officials in Beirut again, this time kidnapping the C.I.A.’s station chief, Bill Buckley. Buckley was tortured and, eventually, murdered. Reagan, who was tormented by a tape of Buckley being tortured, blamed himself. Congress held no public hearings, and pointed fingers at the perpetrators, not at political rivals.

If you compare the costs of the Reagan Administration’s serial security lapses in Beirut to the costs of Benghazi, it’s clear what has really deteriorated in the intervening three decades. It’s not the security of American government personnel working abroad. It’s the behavior of American congressmen at home.

laughingsquid:

‘Remember 1988′, A Video Compilation of Popular Culture From 1988

No Accounting Skills? No Moral Reckoning. →

SOMETIMES it seems as if our lives are dominated by financial crises and failed reforms. But how much do Americans even understand about finance? Few of us can do basic accounting and fewer still know what a balance sheet is. If we are going to get to the point where we can have a serious debate about financial accountability, we first need to learn some essentials.

The German economic thinker Max Weber believed that for capitalism to work, average people needed to know how to do double-entry bookkeeping. This is not simply because this type of accounting makes it possible to calculate profit and capital by balancing debits and credits in parallel columns; it is also because good books are “balanced” in a moral sense. They are the very source of accountability, a word that in fact derives its origin from the word “accounting.”

newsweek:

Police Mugshots Used To Be Really Badass - The Meta Picture
Have we hit peak beard?: Beards Are Less Attractive When They’re Everywhere

The Birth Of The Minimum Wage In America →

npr:

For decades, the Supreme Court ruled that laws regulating wages were unconstitutional. What changed?