This blog is an eclectic collection of interesting things I've found on Tumblr, the rest of the web, and beyond. Its name is taken from this quote by Dinah Craik:"Oh, the comfort — the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person — having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away."

Posts tagged with ‘tv’

Stop calling this TV's golden age. It's still an idiot box, even if you like "Girls," Jon Stewart," and "The Wire." →

I think it happened around Season 3 of “The Wire.” Maybe it was “The Sopranos.” “Curb Your Enthusiasm”? “Lost”? I can’t say. I just know I woke up one day confused.

Everyone, it seemed, had become a walking TV Guide: debating a bubbling vat of dramas and comedies, gossiping and blasting alerts about their pundit show bookings, filling out Which-character-are-you? quizzes. TV coverage had overtaken the media, where magazines, newspapers and websites dissected anticipated serial finales like D-Day.

It wasn’t the existence of new cult shows that left me befuddled, or even the tonnage of critical praise heaped on them. It was the hungry-hippo, remote-happy tone that continues to define this “golden age of TV.” Kill Your Television has morphed into Love Your Television. […]

For years I’ve dreaded writing this. There’s no way to do it without sounding like that stock villain of the postwar American dinner party, the tweedy bore and pretentious prick who makes a loud public show of not owning a TV. For the record, I’m not that guy. But it’s time to call bullshit on the new consensus that TV, in any of its Internet-age mutations, has become our harmless friend, deserving ever-greater amounts of our time and critical coverage limited to endless plot exegesis. It’s time to shout from our dish-cluttered rooftops what has been obvious for years: this celebration of TV’s new “golden age” is out of control. It’s dangerous, and it’s sad.

(via digg)

(via digg)

wnyc:

Time Is A Flat Circus takes Rustin Cohle quotations from True Detective and applies them to Family Circus cartoons.  It’s the best thing the internet has given us this week.
—Sean, Studio 360

wnyc:

Time Is A Flat Circus takes Rustin Cohle quotations from True Detective and applies them to Family Circus cartoons.  It’s the best thing the internet has given us this week.

—Sean, Studio 360

Andrew Sullivan has a good roundup of the news about Stephen Colbert taking over The Late Show.

laughingsquid:

The First Three Seasons of ‘Game of Thrones’ Summarized in Less than 5 Minutes with Maps

Very basic, but good recap.

azspot:

Grace Hopper on Letterman

More on Grace Hopper here.

diggvideos:

Awesome compilation of people reacting to last night’s “Red Wedding” episode of Game Of Thrones.

theatlantic:

The Very Real History Behind the Crazy Politics of ‘House of Cards’

The Netflix series may not be a totally accurate representation of Washington, but a decent number of its more outlandish moments are uncomfortably similar to real life.

Read more. [Image: Netflix]

gq:

The Revolution Was Televised (And Recapped)
In The Revolution Was Televised: The Cops, Crooks, Slingers and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever, longtime critic and blogger Alan Sepinwall deftly tells the stories of twelve shows—from Oz to The Wire, Friday Night Lights to Mad Men—that helped transform television from cultural also-ran to the dominant medium of the first decade of the 21st century (give or take a few years). But the book is also, in its way, the story of another, complementary upheaval: the revolution in how television is covered.
So, it’s no surprise that The Revolution Was Televised has made media news of its own, rising out of the ranks of self-published books to receive a New York Times review and a spot on Michiko Kakutani’s Top Ten Books of 2012. (It was recently picked up by the Touchstone imprint of Simon and Schuster.) Here he talked to GQ about revolutions within revolutions.

gq:


In The Revolution Was Televised: The Cops, Crooks, Slingers and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever, longtime critic and blogger Alan Sepinwall deftly tells the stories of twelve shows—from Oz to The Wire, Friday Night Lights to Mad Men—that helped transform television from cultural also-ran to the dominant medium of the first decade of the 21st century (give or take a few years). But the book is also, in its way, the story of another, complementary upheaval: the revolution in how television is covered.

So, it’s no surprise that The Revolution Was Televised has made media news of its own, rising out of the ranks of self-published books to receive a New York Times review and a spot on Michiko Kakutani’s Top Ten Books of 2012. (It was recently picked up by the Touchstone imprint of Simon and Schuster.) Here he talked to GQ about revolutions within revolutions.
gq:

“The Best TV Show That’s Ever Been”
So says Amy Poehler, and she isn’t alone in thinking ‘Cheers’ is pretty much perfect. On the thirtieth anniversary of the show’s premiere, GQ sat down with just about everyone who made it and asked them about creating Sam and Diane, the birth of Norm!, Woody Harrelson’s one-night stands, and many other secrets of what became TV’s funniest guy show of all time.
 The Oral History of Cheers

gq:

“The Best TV Show That’s Ever Been”

So says Amy Poehler, and she isn’t alone in thinking ‘Cheers’ is pretty much perfect. On the thirtieth anniversary of the show’s premiere, GQ sat down with just about everyone who made it and asked them about creating Sam and Diane, the birth of Norm!, Woody Harrelson’s one-night stands, and many other secrets of what became TV’s funniest guy show of all time.

 The Oral History of Cheers

gq:

Television’s Ubiquitous Alpha Males
Critical darlings like Mad Men and Breaking Bad have television enjoying a new golden age—so why are their protagonists all so damn similar?

gq:

Television’s Ubiquitous Alpha Males

Critical darlings like Mad Men and Breaking Bad have television enjoying a new golden ageso why are their protagonists all so damn similar?

thedailywhat:

Sad ‘Cause It’s True of the Day: It’s Teacher Appreciation Week, and Jimmy Kimmel’s gift to educators across the country was an opportunity to give their students’ parents a piece of their minds.

[jimmykimmel]

(Source: thedailywhat)

From laughingsquid:

The Homosexuals, A 1967 CBS TV Documentary About Homosexuality

From flavorpill:

How David Simon is ruining The Wire (via Nerve)

From rillawafers:

“Get a life, Jews!”

Greg - The Flamboyant Kid on Curb Your Enthusiasm is your new favorite TV character.

(via bbook)